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THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AT CHAPEL HILL 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 

PRESENTED BY 

North Caroliniana 
Society 



C906 
N87s 
no. 19 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 

111 111 111 nun mi 



00031652701 



This book may be kept out one month unless a recall 
notice is sent to you. It must be brought to the North 
Carolina Collection (in Wilson Library) for renewal. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/thomaswolfescomp19wolf 



Thomas Wolfe's Composition Books: 

The North State Fitting School 

1912-1915 



Edited by 

Alice R. Gotten 



NORTH CAROLINIANA SOCIETY IMPRINTS 
NUMBER 19 



This edition is limited to 
three hundred signed copies 
of which this is number 

293 



(£^D 



Publication of Thomas Wolfe's Composition Books is by permission of Paul Gitlin, 
Administrator, C.T.A., Estate of Thomas Wolfe, 919 Third Avenue, New York, 
NY 10022, and the North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina 
Library, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3930. 



[Published simultaneously in an edition 

of six hundred copies by the Thomas 

Wolfe Society for its members. 1 



NORTH CAROLINIANA SOCIETY IMPRINTS 
H. G. Jones, General Editor 

No. 1. An Evening at Monticello: An Essay in Reflection (1978) 
by Edwin M. Gill 

No. 2. The Paul Green I Know (1978) 

by Elizabeth Lay Green 

No. 3. The Albert Coates I Know (1979) 

by Gladys Hall Coates 

No. 4. The Sam Ervin I Know (1980) 

by Jean Conyers Ervin 

No. 5. Sam Ragan (1981) 

by Neil Morgan 

No. 6. Thomas Wolfe of North Carolina (1982) 

edited by H. G. Jones 

No. 7. Gertrude Sprague Carraway (1982) 

by Sam Ragan 

No. 8. John Fries Blair (1983) 

by Margaret Blair McCuiston 

No. 9. William Clyde Friday and Ida Howell Friday (1984) 

by Georgia Carroll Kyser and William Brantley Aycock 

No. 10. William S. Powell, North Carolina Historian (1985) 

by David Stick and William C. Friday 

No. 11. "Gallantry Unsurpassed" (1985) 

edited by Archie K. Davis 

No. 12. Mary and Jim Semans, North Carolinians (1986) 

by W Kenneth Goodson 

No. 13. The High Water Mark (1986) 

edited by Archie K. Davis 

No. 14. Raleigh and Quinn (1987) 

edited by H. G. Jones 

No. 15. A Half Century in Coastal History (1987) 

by David Stick 

No. 16. Thomas Wolfe at Eighty-seven (1988) 

edited by H. G. Jones 

No. 17. A Third of a Century in Senate Cloakrooms (1988) 

by William McWhorter Cochrane 

No. 18. The Emma Neal Morrison I Know (1989) 

by Ida Howell Friday 

No. 19 Thomas Wolfe's Composition Books (1990) 

edited by Alice R. Cotten 



Thomas Wolfe's Composition Books: 

The North State Fitting School 
1912-1915 



<^£D 



Edited by 
Alice R. Gotten 

Foreword by 

John L. Idol, Jr. 



Chapel Hill 27514-0127 

The North Caroliniana Society 

and 

The Thomas Wolfe Society 

1990 



Copyright © 1990 by Paul Gitlin, 

Administrator, C.T.A., Estate of Thomas Wolfe 

919 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022 

All rights reserved 

Manufactured in the United States of America 






<^£X) 



Foreword 

Among the scores of schoolboy sentences scrawled in three of the com- 
position books Thomas Wolfe kept during his studies of English and literature 
under Margaret Roberts at North State Fitting School is the following: 

To become a master of English one must not expect to grow fluent at once. Little 
by little, a word here and a word there and all the time you are growing richer. 
In other words the sun is struggling to break through the clouds. Then in the 
full halo of your glory you find yourself rewarded. 

Try as he might to please his mentor, he emerged from his studies with her 
wearing a battered and tarnished halo. 

Little by little he did grow richer in words, as the sentences he wrote for 
the assigned vocabulary drills attest, but his disregard for neatness, wide spacing 
between words and lines, and habitual sloppiness in forming his letters brought 
out the worst of the Miss Fidget traits in the "mother of his spirit," who 
wanted him to ride Pegasus to Mt. Helicon in the most correct of attire. Her 
chastisements, not always carefully read to catch her own errors, sound too nega- 
tive a note to be encouraging, leaving the reader to conclude that the nurturing 
she gave Wolfe's poetic soul came in her spoken words. Threatening to take 
up Wolfe's laxness with his parents reveals more of Miss Fidget than it does 
a white goddess. 

Lax though he often was, Tommy Wolfe was absorbing literature: Mark 
Twain, Sir Walter Scott, Shakespeare, Milton, Longfellow, Lanier, and Coleridge, 
the last destined to be his favorite poet. Additionally, he evidently pored over 
pages of the King James Version of the Bible. He summarized The Lady of the 
Lake and penned a short essay on The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. To score blows 
on his detested math teacher, he parodied Hamlet's most famous soliloquy. 

Yet other signs point to his growing richer day by day in fluency. He 
reported in vivid detail a fight between "a bulldog and a big sheep dog," a scene 
he would remember and render even more vividly in The Web and the Rock 
(19-20). He made a few autobiographical entries and started his lifelong habit 
of keeping lists. Another sign is his ability to give life, at least occasionally, 
to the round upon round of exercises. For example, 



[v] 



Baseball is my favorite game because it is full of excitement. With two men on 
bases, the score tied, two men out and three balls and two strikes on the batter, 
this is truly a hair-raising time. The batter is between two points, he either gets 
a hit or his base on balls or he fans out. It is in my mind the only radical sport 
for Americans, whose chief food is excitement. 

In passages like this, we catch brief glimpses of Wolfe the reporter and Wolfe 
the social critic. More indicative of the writer to be are the tidbits of narrative 
and characterization that Wolfe would give to the fantasizing Bruce-Eugene 
of Look Homeward, Angel. These fragments of fiction suddenly pop up amidst 
word lists and bespeak a different order of mind behind them. 

But there is more. For the biographer, Wolfe narrates the routine of his 
school day, reveals something of his travels with his mother, and begs Mrs. Roberts 
to lighten his English assignments: 

Asheville, N.C. 
March 30th, 1914 

Dear Mrs. Roberts, — 

English is very hard and I wish you to shorten my lessons. Cooperate, if you 
are my friend and I am 
yours — 

Tom Wolfe 

Here then, in a faithfully rendered copy of Wolfe's composition books by 
Alice Cotten, is a revealing look at Wolfe's schooldays under the tutelage of 
his beloved mentor. That look will draw you closer to him and to her. Here 
neither wears a full halo of glory, but their struggle to break through the clouds 
gives these exercises and comments a special glow anyhow. 

John L. Idol 
Clemson University 



<^££) 



<^#5D 



Introduction 

Thomas Wolfe entered the North State Fitting School in September 1912, 
shortly before his twelfth birthday. Until that time he had attended the Orange 
Street Elementary School in Asheville. John M. Roberts, principal of the Orange 
Street school, resigned that post in the spring of 1912 with plans to open in 
the fall a private school to prepare boys for college. Young Tom Wolfe wrote 
an essay that so impressed Roberts and his wife Margaret that they were deter- 
mined to get him to attend their school. 

Wolfe's attending private school seemed unlikely. His brothers and sisters 
had all gone to public schools, and his parents, always reluctant to part with 
money, were at first hesitant to spend $100 a year for tuition. But Mr. and 
Mrs. Roberts and Tom persuaded Mr. Wolfe to finance his youngest son's private 
education. 

Margaret E. Roberts, wife of principal J.M. Roberts and teacher at the 
North State School, became an important influence on Wolfe, who later called 
her "the mother of my spirit" in inscribing for her a copy of Look Homeward, 
Angel. Mrs. Roberts taught, among other classes, one in English composition 
and literature, and it was this subject that appealed most to Wolfe. 

The North Carolina Collection at the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill has, as part of its Thomas Wolfe Collection, three of Wolfe's English 
composition books from the North State Fitting School. One is dated 1912 
on the cover and contains pages dated from 1912/13. Another has "1914" and 
"#3 English," written on the cover; the only inside date is March 30, 1914. 
The third is dated 1915 on the inside back cover (by Wolfe's sister Mabel), and 
on some pages Wolfe has written "English IV." The books are part of a gift 
to the University in 1950 from the brothers and sisters of Thomas Wolfe in 
memory of their parents, William Oliver and Julia Elizabeth Westall Wolfe. 
The composition books are classed as part of the "CW" (Wolfe Family) Series, 
Volumes 4-6, Box 55. Access to them is only by written consent of the admin- 
istrator of the Estate of Thomas Wolfe. Their publication here is by permission 
of Paul Gitlin, administrator. 

Transcribing Wolfe's handwriting was often difficult, and showing correc- 
tions and comments made by Mrs. Roberts also proved challenging. Except where 



otherwise indicated Wolfe's writing is in black, and any comments or marks 
by Mrs. Roberts are enclosed in brackets and printed in red. What may not 
be obvious at first is Wolfe's lack of attention to spacing, margins, and other 
points of neatness and conformity to style, although Mrs. Roberts often com- 
ments on these shortcomings. Several facsimile pages illustrate the originals. 

Editorial comments are printed in italics. "(Sic)" has been used where appro- 
priate except in the word lists, which are simply printed as Wolfe wrote them. 
Mrs. Roberts often tells Wolfe to "look in Wooley" to find what he did wrong. 
"Wooley" appears to be Edwin Campbell Woolley's Handbook of Composi- 
tion. . . .There are many editions, but the Boston: D.C. Heath, 1907 edition 
seems to match the corrections noted. 

Parts of the notebooks graphically illustrate points made by Margaret Roberts 
in her remembrances, published as "'An Uncommon Urchin,' Thomas Wolfe: 
A Memoir— I" in the Spring 1990 (volume 14, number 1) issue of The Thomas 
Wolfe Review. When, for example, Mrs. Roberts says, "In his composition work 
whatever he wrote was sprawled all over the page. . ., and no feminine desire 
of mine for tidiness ever made the slightest impression on him," it is easy to 
think of examples in these composition books and to imagine her frustration 
in trying to tame Pegasus. 

Wolfe's subjects are varied enough so that each reader should be able to 
find a favorite. He writes of baseball, swimming, and walks in the mountains. 
He tells how much he likes his school, perhaps exaggerating a bit for his 
teacher. He comments on current events, such as the building of the Panama 
Canal, the political situation in Mexico, a flood in Ohio, women's suffrage, 
and the election of Woodrow Wilson. He writes of air travel in 1952 in "A 
Peep Into the Future." He does not neglect local events, mentioning the open- 
ings of the Grove Park Inn and the Majestic Theater and a sale at the "Palais 
Royal." And in the 1915 book he writes movingly about the horror and devastation 
of war and of an "impossible dream" of peace. Through the sloppiness and the 
rote exercises Wolfe's talent as a writer begins to emerge. 

Wolfe's last year at the North State Fitting School was 1915/16. That year 
he received the medals for debate, declamation, and essay. Readers interested 
in learning more about Wolfe's days at the North State Fitting School may want 
to consult, in addition to the article already mentioned, David Herbert Donald's 
Look Homeward: A Life of Thomas Wolfe (Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 
1987) and Johnny Park Talks of Thomas Wolfe by William J. Cocke (Asheville, 
N.C.: the author, 1973), the latter a reminiscence by a classmate. 



[vinj 



The computer expertise of Jerry Cotten made this project much less daunt- 
ing than it might have been. Throughout the complicated and tedious process 
of layout and design, it was reassuring to know that Wolfe Society member 
Tim Elliott of the University's Printing and Duplicating Department had an 
unusual interest in this publication. 

Special thanks to Dr. H. G. Jones, Curator of the North Carolina Collec- 
tion at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, who had the idea 
of publishing these composition books, and who meticulously guided each step 
from transcription to publication, yet refused to take any credit. 

Alice R. Cotten 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



(£^D 




" 



WANY 




I fj^ABOOK FQPJ & 



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[inside front cover] 

[Consult page 254 of Everyday Eng. II for the meaning of the signs I use in 
correction.] 

(Editor's Note: The following notation is in the handwriting of Mabel Wolfe Wheaton: 
"Corrections are Mrs. Roberts' whom Tom portrayed as Margaret Leonard his 
teacher/'L.H. Angel.'") 



[1] 



Swimming. 

Three boys and myself [ ? ] started for the swimming pool. There we met 
about a dozen more boys who were just "going in." 

After an hour or so we prepared to go but a well directed volley of rocks 
ar[?]oused our attention. 

A man, two dogs, and a boy were trailing us down. "You boys know 
its agin' the law to swim in this pool," he shouted. We threw our clothes over 
the barb [ ? ] fence, and although I was one of the smallest I was not the last 
one over the fence [,] by any means. 

After running a half-mile ef or so we put on our clothes. Dodging behind 
trees [,] hiding in the corn by but always the barks [(?)] of those dogs. 
[Is this a complete sentence?] 



[2] 

[Caps] at last [ J however [,] the sounds grew fainter. All at once we heard cries 
and shouts. Fresh fear assailed us but we were relieved to find it was the other 
body of boys who went in another direction. We wended our way homeward [ , ] 
telling our experiences. 

[Not so long as I wanted but well written. Dot your i's.] 



[2] 




North State Fitting School (top), attended by Thomas Wolfe, who, in a photo dated April 
12, 1915, posed (bottom) with (left to right) Henry Harris, Wolfe, foe Taylor, fulius Martin, 
Junius Horner, Reid Russell, and Fred Thomas. 



[3] 



[3] 



The Baseball Game 

Hill and Brill were to play each other. The batteries were respectively as 
follows: "Spud" [(1)] Wilson for Hill, "Tat" [(1)] Hamburck for Brill. 

The first inning opened up with Hill at bat. Jones opened up with a single. 
This was encourageing (sic) for Hill, but their triumph was short [?] lived 
[(2)] for the next two men struck out. 

The two pitchers now settled down to a steady grueling [?] fight. Nothing 
happened till the seventh inning then Hill knocked out a two bagger. As Brown 
shot around the fk first base three hundred voices rose jubilantly with the yells; 
[ " ] s[ S ] lide, you old mackerel, slide." 

over 



[4] 

Schyler walked to the base with set teeth and his "hickory" [(2)] in his hand. 
Hamburck wound up and delivered the "pill" with tremendous force over the 
plate. 

A short but convincing crack met our ears and Brown shot in home. Schyler 
was put out at first and so was the next man. 

[(1) When writing nicknames regularly applied to persons instead of their names, 
do not inclose in quotations. 

(2) Quotation marks not needed here. Ask me if you do not understand. Have 
you used thirty terms peculiar to base ball?] 



[5] 



Tom Wolfe 1912 

Banker Ball-player 

Cashier mitt 

credit glove 

debtit ball 



safe deposit vaults umpire 



[4] 



safe 


catcher 


vault 
bank clerks 


pitcher 
shortstop 


stenographer 
adding machine 


first base 
second base [ 


mortgage 


third base [? 


directors 


home plate 


ledgers 


batter 


discount 


bat 


profit 
checque 
deposit 
loans 


bleachers 
grand-stand 



[6 - blank] 



[7] 



The advantages and disadvantages of being a blacksmith 

A blacksmith's life is rough. In all likelihood[ . ] he is apt to be strong and 
hearty[,] for who ever heard of a delicate blacksmith. 

His work brings him no riches but he has enough to lifee live comfortably 
in a humble way. He is everyone[']s friend for there is nothing in his occupation 
to rouse enmity. 

His work is useful and he e honestly de.erves all he make[s.] [new paragraph] 
On the other hand[ , ] there are disadvantages. He cannot send his children to 
college as he is not able. He is not able to partake in [ot] the pleasures of the 
world and denys himself good literature and the news of the world outside, (over) 



[8] 

There are many things he would like to have and would like his children to 
have but he is not able to get [them.] 

But on the wholef,] he is to be envied, for is he not happy[?] 

[You are not doing as good work as you are can.] 



[5] 



[9 - 10 blank] 



[11] 



February 5th. 1913 

English. 
Tom Wolfe 1913 

He has the ability to build the building. 

His mind capacity is enormous. 

This dictionary is the abridgment of the standard. 

The compendium of the laws were put in a book. 

The epitome of the book was accomplished . I?] 

Abstract 1(1) Use as a noun. J numbers are those that have no special meaning. 

I read the synopsis of the serial story. 

His account of the voyage was interesting. 

During the narrative no - on e nobody moved. 

His narration of the event was received in silence. 

Their recital of the tfa trial was interesting. 

He will acknowledge the fact. 

Do you recognize him? 



[12] 

Add those numbers. 

Did they join you. [?] 

The annex of the store was beautiful. 

They will unite in marriage. 

1(1)1 They will coalesce. 

[(1) This sentence does not show that you understand the meaning of the word.] 

[Your work since Christmas has not been satisfactory. I shall be forced to call 
your mother up to get her co-operation unless you begin to do your work more 
faithfully. You are a boy of great ability, but you must study too. You read 
a great deal, and that is good, but too much reading is not to be desired any 
more than two (sic) little.] 



[6] 




, 























[7] 



[13] 



February, 7th. 1913 

En glish 
Tom Wolfe. 1913 

The stores are adjacent to each other. 

Adjoining his house was the department store. 

I will [shall] visit all the contigious (sic) countries. 

The admission to the show was five cents. 

The admittance to the room was refused me. 

My picture will adon [??] the bureaux. 

It is a pretty ornament. 

I will [shall] decorate the building. 

He employed many words to embelish his literature. 

He had the advantage over me. 

It is an advantageous opportunity. 

He will benefit by it. 

It will be beneficial to us to learn the poem. 

My adversary was strong. 

His enemy glared at him 



[14] 

My opponent in the debate had a good argument. 

His antagonist stood with sword half [-]drawn. 

The allegory [(]pi the book[)] was very interesting. 

Christ told his disciples a parable. 

The dressmaker will alter the dress. 

The change could be plainly seen. 

[?]A.midst the apostles there was a traitor. 

There was a black sheep among the white. 

The ancient mariner told us a story. 

The buildings in New Orleans are antiquated. 

The word is obsolete. 

He sells antique furniture. 

The book is old and tattered. 

I will [shall] announce the engagement. 



[8] 




Margaret Roberts, Thomas Wolfe's teacher at North State Fitting School. 



[9] 



[15] 



We will [shall] publish the book in due time. 

Herald, proclaim my marriage^ to all the country. 

He will promulgate his ideas. 

His brow contracted during the [reading of] allegory^ 

I anticipate the party with much pleasure. 

I expect to see him soon. 

I will not argue with him. 

Will you dispute his claims? 

The debate waxed hard hot. 

Will he see me? 

You will [shall] ask him also. 

We will [shall] discuss the coming events. 

He is an artisan of his trad e 

My artist will paint his picture. 

He is an artificer of of (sic) fine jewelery (sic). 



[16] 

Did he ser assent to the proposition. 

He obtained my consent . 

The battle was continued with renewed vigor. 

The combat between the gladiators was f e ru s fierce. 

The two boys had a fi ght . 

We had a bloody engagement which left an empty space where teeth had been, 

a few bunches of hair on the turf and several marks on us that looked as if 

we had been traders in India ink. 

I will beg him to do it. 

I will [shall] ask you. 

I will [shall] request this service [.] 

We will [shall] divide it between you. 

I will divide it among the rest. 

Its (sic) a bad blunder. 



[10] 



[17] 

He made an error. 

You made a mistake. 

That is an Irish bull. 

I am bound to the contract. 

The boundary is not very far. 

I calculate it to be correct. 

[ iS ] I will compute te the numbers. 

You reckon the figures correctly. 

I will [shall] count the men. 

[You must be neater in the arrangement of your pages. Your sentences are good 
indeed. 1 



[18] 



We Celebrate the Fourth of July. 



We commemorate the death of great men. 

The Fire Chief hurried to the fire! 

The chieftain of Clan [ - ]Alpine was Rhoderick Dhu. 

The commander of the American army was George Washington. 

The leader of the boys was red-headed and freckled [- jfaced. 

The cloister of the nuns stood grim and forbidding. 

The monastery was made of stones. 

The nunnery contained many [(1)] nuns. 

It was [(1)] a large convent. 

There [(1)] is the a[A]bbey of St. [(1)] John's. 

The priory was the home 



[19] 

[ 1. red-headed, not red headed. You should must avoid leaving so much space 
between words. 1 



of the prior. 

We [(1)] conquer [(1)] the Galls [ S p.; 



[11] 



Ceasar (sic) will vanquish the Belgians. 

The teacher [(1)] will subdue the boy. 

I will [(1)] subjugate [(1)] him to meekness. 

The South was overcome in [(1)] the [(1)] Civil [(1)] War. 

He was a [(1)] constant [(1)] suitor. 

It was [(1)] a [(1)] continual war. 

The eat [(1)] earth [(1)] is a sphere [(1)] of[(l)] perpetual motion. 

His [(1)] conversation flowed out in eloquent language. 

He is [(1)] the [(1)] talk of the country. 

I will convince him of the [(1)] justness of the magistrate. 

Persuade him for me. 

We will defend ourselves. 

Pledge yourself to protect the weak. (over) (over) 



[20] 



The definition of the word is clear. 

I will [shall] give you an explanation of my absence. 

The description of the event was in colloquial language. 

The cake was delicious. 

They had a delightful time. 

I list e n e d will [shall] listen to their conversation. 

The talk was interesting. 

Go in the opposite direction. 

He gained control of the car. 

His command was imperative. 

Will you order the horsemen to fight? 

I will discover the source of the river. 

Edison will invent something new. 

He has an evil disposition. 

That is a bad character. 

Andrew Jackson has a hot temper. 

He is a distinguished statesman. 



[12] 



[21] 

You are an eminent surgeon. 

He has a conspicuous nose on his face. 

It is a celebrated painting. 

She is an illustrious actress. 

He preaches a queer doctrine. 

I was taught by precept. 

The man will draw water from the well. 

He shall drag it on the ground. 

The boy was eager to commence. 

He [(1)] wore [(1)] an [(1)] earnest look. 

His education was complete. 

My instruction in certain branches was complete. 

She [(1)] was [(1)] teaching the F[ f ] ifth grade [or both with capitals.]. 

The foot ball f(l)l [(1)1 [(1)1 1(1)1 [(1)1 play er [(1)] [(1)] went into training. 

He has had good breeding. 

It was the emblem of peace. 

It is a sign of the times. 

It is a symbol of good-will. 

That is a fine type of manhood 



[22] 

He is an immigrant into this country 

That man was an emigrant out of the country. 



[13] 



[23] 

[Tom, you are capable of doing excellent work, so I can have no patience with 

such scrawling.] 

(Editor's Note: Mrs. Roberts crossed out this entire page with a big red "X.") 

Tom Wolfe 1913 

Asheville Citizen 
" Gazette 
Augusta Chronicle 
Ba Atlanta Georgian 

Star 
Baltimor Observer 
Charlotte News & Observer 
Columbia State 

Gazette Newspaper containing official announcements. 

My name for our newspaper The North State Observer. 

Commission form of government discussed. 

Much interest has been aroused of late over the Commission Form of Government. 
The Board of Aldermen met last night to debate upon this question. 

Asheville's new hotel the Grove Park Inn is nearing completion. The beautiful 
structure is being built without regard to expense. 



[24 - blank] 



[25] 



N.C. Legislature is criticised on its conduct. 

Tom Wolfe 1913. 

There is 

Much criticism on the North Carolina Legislature is h e ard . Many important 

bills have been neglected by this august body of "statesmen." 

(Editor's Note: Mrs. Roberts crossed out the paragraph above with a red "X.") 
[14] 









h/ 







[15] 



The Mexican reveolt (sic) is practically closed. 

There will be no need of the United States taking action. 

It is said that Pres. [Do not abbreviate.] Wilson finds Taft's chair is uncomfortable. 

Arrangements have been made for a new chair. 

The Carolina League is getting ready to play B[b]all. 



[26] 

The beautiful new theater[ , ] building — the Majestic[ , ] was opened on Monday 
with due pomp and splendor. 

Madame de Melne, the famous Clairovoyant has disappeared from town. The 
lady's disappearance would not cause so much anxiety had it not been for the 
fact that in mindreading she had found it nessesary (sic) to keep several young 
valuables of young ladies. Among them is a diamond ring worth two-hundred- 
dollars. 

[Should leave space here.] 
Five Thousand Lost in Flood. 

Much sympathy is being felt for the homeless and the suffering in th e who 
were victims of the blizzard which has recently devasted the West and East. 
It is said that five thousand people are drownded (sic) in Dayton, Ohio. 



[27] 

Mark Twain was in a restaurant one - day. Two young men sat near him 
[who were] inclined to "blow". One of them said to the waiter, "Waiterf,] 
said he , "Tell the chef to cook me a plank [(1)] steak and be sure you tell him 
who[m] it is for." 

Mark who hated ["]blow and bluster called to the waiter and said, "Waiter[,] 
bring me a dozen oysters and whisper my name to each one of them." 

I strongly disagree to this improvement, Mr. Moore suggests. The idea 
of grading this hill down is foolishf , ] not to say almost impossible. He also 
wishes a new adition (sic) to be added. Consider for a moment the money it 
will cost. Thousands of dollars and the school treasury 



[16] 



[28] 

has not that much money. 

Wanted 

One new standard make type-writer. At sale at a bargain. 

For sale. Six[-]room house $1200 cash. All modern conveneances (51c). 

For sale. New[,]Bargain[,] 8 room bungalow at $3,250. Good terms. Phone 1831. 

For sale. A number of small and large farms. Room 9, Revell building. 

For sale. 3300 acres of mixed timber, Virgin growth in East Tenesee (sic). 

Look Watch Listen 

The Palais Royal starts its big annual sale today. 20% discounts on all goods. 
We have to get rid of $50,000 ef worth of stock by April 10. 
Store Open at 10 o'clock. 



[29] 

Commission form of government is discussed by Aldermen. 

Mexican Revolt is at an end. 

5000 killed in flood 

[Tom, this work is truly distressing to me. You are a boy capable of doing 
exceptional work in English, but you grow worse in your written work instead 
of better. Your ideas are good and well expressed but slovenly written beyond 
endurance. Understand now that from now on, I shall require you to rewrite 
every bit of such careless work. Look at Williams and you will find an example 
of pleasing work. You must get into that class. 

Also go to work on your word-book. I do not find any figures of speech in 
your book.] 

[30 - blank] 



[17] 





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[18] 



[31] 



English 
Tom Wolfe. 1913. 

I. 

(a) To shut a door the door is closed abruptly . 

To shut up a room the room is disconnected with everything shut off from 
the outside world. 

(b) " From whence came this man." The sentence is correct. 

(c) Exaggerate. In the great level near Thorny several oaks and firs stand in 
the firm earth below the moor, covered by the fresh and salt waters and moorish 
earth exaggerated [?] upon them. 

Ned. Original meatning need, needful. 

II. (a) Let us take a drive in the phaeton. A phaeton is patterned after the Roman 

Chariot, 
(b) A person in tears is called maudlin. 

The mother of Christ [Mary Magdalene] shedding tears over his death 
was called maudlin. 



[32] 

(c) "Sentimental Tommy" while writing his essay balked on one word. Several 
other words would have nearly answered the purpose but not exactly. With 
the persistence that characterized Abraham Lincoln and other great masters of 
English he "wasted" his time and lost the prize but was victorious and found 
the right word. 

( d ) Which are the more poetical terms. 

bring-up rear < 

big vast < 

journey < jog 

(e) By the connotation of a word w one means its meaning and how it fits 
in with other words. 

III. (a) Synonyms are two words that are alike. 

anticipate 
expect 



[19] 



[33] 

(b) To become a master of English one must not expect to grow fluent at 
once. Little by little, a word here and a word there and all the time you are 
growing richer. In other words the sun is struggling to break through the clouds. 
Then in the full halo of your glory you find yourself rewarded. 

No need of slow hesitation in picking out the words and you are a person 
to be envied and admired. 

(c) a gang of ruffians, 
a group of strikers 
a pack of cards. 

d. I anticipate vacation withe the keenest delight. 
I expect to receive a letter. 
The ancient Greeks were warlike. 
That is an antiquated enjine 
That plant is obsolete. 
They are dealers in antique furniture. 
He is an old man. 
He is an eminent physician. 
His nose is conspicuous. 
It is a celebrated story. 



[34] 

Word (sic) that spring from one branch are doublets, pity - piety 

IV. (a) Doubl e ts ar e words that sound alik e but ar e diff e r e nt. Noah built th e ark. 

His hand described an arc. 

I pity him. 

The monke (sic) piety. 

The Arch de Triumph is in Paris. 

The ball described an arc. 

Benedict Arnold committed treason. 

It is a tradition the [that] T J. Jackson was never defeated, 
(b) 1. Use good English. 

2. Be neat. 

3. Express your ideas well. 

4. Come straight to the point. 



[20] 



V. (a) To have a refined and accurate pronunciation one must be a master of 

English. [How get it?] 

(b) When you get real a good book be prepared as the Australian Miner 
is. Let your sleeves be rolled back, you (sic) pickaxe sharp, your patience and 
your temper good. But read carefully and ten pages of a good book will do 
you more good 



[35] 

than if you had skipped hastily over a whole book. 

II. (a) When with another person you are discussing a point on which you 
differ, listen patiently to his side, with no interruptions till he is through, 
fe At a party one must be fluent at light talk. 

(b) Poetic verse is verse that rhymes. [Not necessarily.] 

Stressed syllables are syllables in which it is necessary to let the voice 

rise to bring out the point. 

Unstressed syllables are syllables in which no emphasis is used. 

(c) "Under a spreading chestnut tree, (a) 
The village Smithy stands, (b) 

The smith a mighty man is he, (a) 
With large and sinewy hands (b) 
And the muscles of his brawny arms (c) 
Are strong as iron bands, (b)" 



[36] 

The internal rhyme is the inside rhyme. 

The easy going fluent rhythm of the Song of the Chatahoochee makes it a 

beautiful poem. 

Lanier uses a beautiful rhyme scheme. 

Lanier uses double rhymes. 

His thought is beautiful. 

VII. A meistersinger was a minstrel who* appeared in the North of Germany. 
A mennesinger was a minstrel who appeared in the south of Germany. 
An Epic poem was a poem pertaining to the Heroic. 



[21] 



[37] 












(W/ 



[38] 



teacher 


telegrapher 


teach 


telegraph 


desk 


message 


school 


key 


pupils 


instrument 


blackboard 


telegraphy 


chalk 


wires 


text books 


Morse key 


drawing 


operator 


mathematics 


ticker 


geography 


keyboard 


arithmetic 




examination 




report 





[39] 



trunkmaker 


veterinary surgeon 


trays 


horses 


compartment 


wound 


buckle 


instruments 


lock 


spavin 



[22] 



strap 

compartment 

trunk 

buckle 

trunk-key 

steamer-trunk 



hydrophobia 
black-tongue 



[40] 



violinist 

violin 

string 

bow 

chord 

octave 

wax 

tone 

music 

bowstrings 

buttons 



wagonmaker 

shaft 

seat 

bed 

wagon 

wheels 

spokes 

hub 

axle 

springs 



loom 

spool 

thimble 

threads 

cloth 

weaving machine 

knit 

needle 

thread 



[23] 



[41] 



The Lady of the Lake. 

The stranger out hunting becomes lost. His horse stumbles and he kills 
it to put it out of pain. A mountain maid Ellen guides him to safety and a 
nights lodging. Ellen belongs to a clan who have gone out on an expedition. 
Her father has been banished from the court and lives with her cousin Rhoderick 
Dhu who is in love with her. His love is not rewarded however as she is in 
love with Malcolm Graeme. After a nights lodging the stranger returns with 
a guide. The clan returns home. Rhoderick quarrels with Malcolm. Rhoderick 
receives news that the king his enemy has sent out an expedition for him. The 
fiery cross is sent around, the men assemble and old Brian preaches a curse on 
he (sic) who does not do his duty. Ellen and her father Douglas have returned 
to the mountain to be out of the way. Rhoderick swears to put his love aside. 
The stranger, James Fitz James in love with Ellen is a kings man. At great 
peril he returns to see Ellen but learns of the other love. Sadly he journeys back 
to Stirling with a guide. On the way they meet a crazy woman who warns 
James. The guide kills her and is killed by James. James swears to avenge himself 
on Rhoderick. 



[42] 

James taking the dead womans warning leaves the main road and takes a bypath. 
Hungry, cold, and exhausted he comes upon the camp of Rhoderick Dhu. 
Rhoderick Dhu obeys the mountain law of hospitality and gives him food and 
shelter. 

Rhoderick Dhu[ , ] in honor bound[ , ] is guiding Fitz James to safety. How- 
evert,] he does not disclose his identity to Fitz James. Fitz James tells Dhu 
that he has placed his life in danger to see a Highland maid. He tells Dhu that 
he did not come [(1)] as [(1)] a spy for the king's side [(1)] even [(1)] though 
he has already [(1)] made two visits but when [(1)] he came the third time 
he will come with banner, sword and bow to subdue that haughty chieftain 
Roderick "A Love sick swain never was so eager to meet his lady as I am to 
meet Roderick Dhu." 

"You shall have your wish" said Roderick and he whistles shrilly. In one 
instant the hill and crags bristle with men [(1)] of war brandishing shields, 
swords, bows and arrows. 

Fitz James is astonished for 

[24] 



[43] 

it is as if the earths has cast them forth from subterranean depths. Five hundred 
men stand before him fully equipped and with war bonnets on. 

The Mountaineer looks with pride at Fitz James [as] the [he] glances at 
the mountain which seems to have sprung to life. Then with darkening brow 
he turns to Fitz James and says, "These are Clan[-] Alpines warriors, and I am 
Rhoderick Dhu." 

[Such an improvement gives me much pleasure. Be continually careful not to 
leave wide spaces between words. (1) Too much space.] 

A fight ensues in which Rhoderick is defeated £ by James. James has the 
wounded man taken to Stirling and put into prison. Douglas comes disguised 
as a peasant to sue as- for peace. He is recognized by the king. In the athletic 
contests held that day Douglas is victor. A servant strikes his dog and he strikes 



[44] 

the servant. He is thrown into prison for this act. Ellen with Allan-bane comes 
to Stirling with the king's ring James had given her to ask for her fathers freedom. 
Respect is rendered her when the king's ring is f shown. 

Allan-bane gains conference with Rhoderick and finds the chieftain dieing. 
With his harp he relates a stirring account of the battle between the king's 
men and the clan in which the neither side was victorious. At the conclusion 
Rhoderick without a sound dies. 

To Ellen's surprise James Fitz-James is Scotland's King. The king and her 
father are at peace once more. 

When the king learns that Malcolm Graeme is Ellens lover he confines 
Malcolm to "chains and fetters." Throwing his own chain around the neck of 
Malcolm and putting the 



[45] 

clasp in Ellen's hand the story comes to a happy conclusion. 

[46 - blank] 

[25] 



[47] 

[You must be neat in your work.] 

Figures of speech 

"Are strong as iron bands." 

"Like gallant courtiers, the forest trees." 

"Like the strange portents of the prophet's bush." 

"Like golden fruit of the Hesperides." 

"Stand like Druids of old." 

"Sand like harpes hoar." 

"Leaped like the roe." 

"Scattered like dust and leaves." 

"His mane is like a river flowing." 

"I am like the blossom of an hour" 

"Or I am like the stream that flows." 

"Like chaff from a threshing floor" 

"And his eyes are like embers glowing." 

"And like a king in royal purples fold." 

"A baby's feet like sea shells pink." 

[48] 

"But he shall be like a tree." 

"The ungodly are not so but are like the chaff." 

"Thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potters vessel." 

"Lest he tear my soul like a lion." 

As silver tried in a furnace of earth 



[26] 



[49] 



Feb. 5. 










1913 


Tom Wolfe. 




English. 




1913 




architect 






astronomer 






blue print 
India ink 






clouds 
stars 






plans 






comets 






crow quill pens 






planets 






instruments 






moon 






roof 






astronomical clock 






gable 
foundation 






telescope 
astronomical signs 






blueprint 






astronomical year 






compass 












T square 
T (?) square 
level 














[50 ■ 


- blank] 





[51] 

[(1) O'er is poetical, not good in prose.] 



Tom Wolfe. 



1912 



A daring Expedition. 

England an (sic) France were at swords ends, so to speak. England demanded 
an explanation from France or war impended. 



[27] 



The colonies sent a brave young cavalier whose name was George Wash- 
ington [,] as courier to the French. With only one guidelJ he went through 
the savage woods, o'[v]er [(1)] hill and dale, onward and onward till he reached 
Quebec. 

The French were very courteous as become a great race. But when 
Washington came to the object of his search the French governor politely but 
firmly refused to meet England's demands. 

Washington immediately started back. As he was journeying swiftly through 
a forest a savage bored a neat hole in his cap. When the English received the 
answer [,] war was declared. [Decided improvement.] 



[52 - blank] 



[53] 



Tom Wolfe. 1912. 

In 1642 [,] Sir William Berkely came over to be governor of Virginan (sic). 
Berkely was an [too much space] aristocrat, a brave soldier, and a gentleman 
in in (sic) every sense. He did not believe in popular government[.] h[H]e believed 
in royal government. 

When the question arose as to whether public-schools should stay in Virginia 
he flew into a rage and said he thanked God there were [(1)] no [(1)] such 
things in [(1)] Virginia. 

At this time the king cooly gave the whole country to two of his favorites. 
The people of Virginia had been shot at by troops. Bacon[ , ] a young man of 
good birth[ , ] was made captain of volunteers and Berkely declared him a rebel. 
Bacon died and Berkely killed his followers. [Good.] 

(Editor's Note: Mrs. Roberts's "(1)" means too much space between words.) 

[54 - blank] 



[28] 



[55] 



Tom Wolfe. 1912. 

afflict - to strike (affigo) 

alderman - elder man 

alphabet - alpha, bata (sic) 

apprehend - to sieze (sic) to 

assault - to leap to. 

astonish - To afflict with surprise 

attend - to wait upon, (attendo) 

auction - increase 

automobile - sef self mover 

awful - awe inspiring. full of awe 

by - cycle (by + cyclus). 

candidate - (candidatus candidus) one who seeks position. 

carpenter - (carpentier). artificer who builds 

chandelier - candelarius A movable wooden frame of ornamentle (sic) design 

circumstances.- (circumstantia) Something existing or occurring. 

comfort.- (confort) To give cheer. 

correct - (cumrego). rule together. 

counterfeit - (countrefeat) bonus (sic) money. 

crafty. - Skillful in deceiving. 



[56 - blank] 

[57] 

cunning - (cunnian) test. 

curfew - cover fire, couvir fire 

curious - (curiosus) eager for information 

digress - (digressus) deviate, wander 

dilapidated - (dilapadatus) impair by neglect 

disaster - (astrum) mishap. 

(ill star) - a calamity 

disease - any failure or perversion of normal physological (sic) in living organism. 



[29] 



doctor - (teach) a practioner (51c) of medicine or surgery. 

erring - (wander) to wander from truth, to make mistakes. 

exaggerrated - to heap up, to carry, described or represented with exaggerrated 

proportions, 
exile - (from soil) Banishment from native soil, home or land. 



[58] 

ghost - (agost) imaginary image 

gospel - (good messenger, to teach gospe to. 

grocer - (great) one who deals in coffee, teas, sugar, and country produce. 

guest - (stranger) (enemy) a person received and entertained 

handsome - beautiful in figure, excelling in form or grace 

horrid - (horridolus) Fitted to inspire horror. 

hussy - (Hussies) A pert or forward girl. 

impede - (impedio) To be an obstacle 

inculcate - (inculcatus) To impress upon the mind. 

innocent - Not tainted with sin. 



[59] 

[Remember not to leave such big gaps between words that all of your thoughts 
leak out.] 

I [x] remember [x] this incident quite [x] clearly [x] and [it] increases 
my [x] admiration and respect for my old friend Mr. Roosevelt. It was just 
after his return from Africa and he was making a speech in Knoxville. 

I was to introduce Mr. Roosevelt. After I had made the introduction [and] 
the -the ex. Presid. was well into his speech as sound of piteous crying was heard. 
Looking down the Mr. Roosevelt saw a small boy. "What is the matter, my 
boy," he asked. "I'm, I'm lost and I car[']t find my father." D 

"Do you know who this child is," he asked me. 

It happened that I did not by but after much difficulty I found his father. 

"Well, I guess that jobs is finished." he said to me. [Did he say guess ?] 

(Editor's Note: Mrs. Roberts's "x" means too much space.) 



[30] 



[60] 

I had the privilege of listening to the Rev. Dr. Patton the other night [move 
after privilege 1 who spoke on the opportunities of the southland. He gave a 
full account of the cotton industry in the South of which the last crop brought 
$1,000,000,000. 

Blair M: "Mrs. Robertsf,] I was sick last night and didn't get to study my lesson." 

Norman H: "Me to[o], I had a tumble bad headache." 

Reid R.: "Aw, listen at them, ain[']t that a poor excuse." 

Tom W.: "I bet old Norman went fox-hunting." 

Mrs. R.: "Well boys you may stay in the [this] afternoon till you have gotten 

your lesson." 



[61] 







February 5, 


1913 






English. 




Tom Wolfe. 










Beekeeper 




Banker 




honey 




Bank 




comb 




deposit 




bees 




credit 




hive 




debtit [ x ] 




wax 




loan 




cells 




cashier 




queen bees 




vault 




buzz 




money 




sting 




safe-deposit vault 




flowers 




teller 
loans 



1913 



[31] 



[62] 







February 5, 


1913 






English 




Tom Wolfe. 










Boatbuilder 




Blacksmith 




ribs 




hammer 




spars 




horseshoe 




masts 




horse 




shrouds 




wheel 




deck 




forge 




cabin 




rivets 




sails 




anvils 




hold 




leather apron 




bow 




axle 




stern 




hub 




port-holes 




sledge-hammer 



1913 



[You must be more careful as to neatness.] 



[63] 







February 5, 


1913. 






English 




Tom Wolfe 










bookeeper 




botanist 




account 




botany 




creditor 




plants 




debtor 




animal 




bills 




vegetation 




Files 




growth 




ledger 




rainfall 




cash-book 




instruments 




tickets 








safe 








stenographer 







1913 



[32] 



[64] 



Ballplayer 

home plate 

First base 

Sec. " 

Third " 

ball 

glove 

mitt 

bleachers 

mask 

breastprotector 

diamond 

shortstop 

rightfield 

left field 

Center field 

pitcher's box 

catcher's box 



brakeman 

brakes 

sequals 

flags 

danger-lights 



Beekeeper 

apiary 

Bees 

hives 

cones 

wax 

honey 

queen bee 

drone 

bumble-bee 

cells 



[65] 



bricklayer 

mortar 

foundation 

cement 

bricks 

plastering 

smoother 



butcher 

meat 

bones 

meat chopper 

sausage grinders 

cold storage 

butchers knifes 

Meat Saws 

Chickens 

Turkeys 



[33] 



[66] 



carpenter 

lumber 

hammer 

Saw 

nails 

screw driver 

adz 

hole borer 



circus-hand 

ring 

trapeze 

side shows 

circus 

elephant 

lion 

tiger 

bear 

acrobats 

tumblers 

ring-master 



[67] 



coachman 

coach 

horse 

whip 

box 

harness 

stall 

feed 

acoutrements 

collar 



college student 

college 

proffessor 

campus 

gymnasium 

Y.M.C.A. 

football grounds 

baseball grounds 

Chapel 

Study Hall 



[68] 



contractor 

lumber 

plans 

plaster 

plasterers 

masonry 

scaffold 

cement 

lime 

sand 

brick 



cook 

stove 

kitchen 

oven 

fire 

kitchen-knives 
" forks 
" pots 
" pans 

egg beater 

cake pan 



[Why do you leave such a street between your words?] 



[34] 



[69] 



dairy-man 

milk 

cows 

dairy 

milk wagan 

milk bottles 

milk cans 

cow pasture 

cream 

creamery 

butter 

buttermilk 



dentist 
teeth 

dentists chair 
teeth medicine 
false teeth 
gold fillings 
teeth cleaner 
mouth washer 
drill 



[70] 



dock-hand 

docks 

ships 

shipping 

ship-building 

wharves 

dikes 

ferries 

fords 

bridges 

divers 

Marines 

sailors 

captain 

mates 



dollmaker 
dolls 

dolls dresses 
wax 

dolls shoes 
dolls stockings 
dolls hair 
rag dolls 
sawdus dolls 
doll factory 
billikens 
Campbell Kids 
dolls joints 



[71] 



dressmaker 

dresses 

silk 

satin 

cotton 

woll 

hooks 

eyes 

needle 

thread 



druggist 

drugs 

opium 

cocaine 

morphine 

soda-water 

ice-cream 

camphor 

cold-cream 

powder 



[35] 



sewingmachine 

scissors 

lace 

chiffon 



rouge 

salhepatica 

fountain 



[72] 



editor 

newspaper 

magazine 

periodical 

book 

reporter 

type 

typesetter 

print 

printing press 

"cub" reporter 

city editor 

news 



election judge 

polls 

ballots 

voters 

votes 

candidates 

public offices 

mayor 

alderman 

police judge 

sherriff 



[73] 



engineer 

engine 

throttle 

steam 

pressure 

air brakes 

fireman 

whistle 

gauge-cocks 

fire box 

engine bell 



entomologist 

insects 

entomology 

habits of insects 

study of insects 

spiders 

flies 



[74] 



farmer 

reaper 

binder 

sheaver 

spreader 

plow 



fireman 

coal 

engine box 

engineer 

whistle 

lubrication 



[36] 



furrow 

wheat 

corn 

vegetables 

fruits 

harvester 

thresher 

farm house 

cream-separator 



steam 

signal whistle 
coal tender 
cow catcher 



[75] 



fisherman 

fish 

boats 

hook 

line 

rod 

reel 

salting 

salmon 

cod 

halibut 

alewives 



furrier 

furs 

skins 

animals 

traders 

trading posts 

hunters 

white fox 

skunk 



[76] 



grocer 

groceries 

grocery stores 

grocery wagon 

coffee 

sugar 

salt 

pepper 

cocoa 

cheese 

beans 

potatoes 

canned goods 



hardware merchant 

hardware store 

guns 

pistols 

shot 

nails 

tools 

farm implements 

wagons 

toys 

bicycles 



[37] 



[77] 



harness maker 

harness 

collar 

blanket 

hames 

reins 

bridle 

bit 

shafts 

stay straps 

rein rings 

saddle 

stirrup 



herbgrower 

herbs 

sasufras 



[78] 



hunter 

gun 

skins 

powder 

shot 

ramrod 

trigger 

barrel 

chamber 

gauge 

hammer 



Indian 

brave 

squaw 

papoose 

chief 

medicine-man 

pueblo 

bow 

arrows 

warpath 

war-dance 

tepee 

venison 



[79] 



Insurance Agent 

Policy 

Premium 



Janitor of Church 

pews 

pulpit 

organ 

aisle 

choir 

congregation 

collection 

collection-box 

Church-bell 

Sunday School room 



[38] 



[80] 



Journalist 

Journal 

diary 

events 

Circulation 

Chief Editor 

Editors 

magazine 

newspaper 

press 

agency 



Kindergartner 
Kindergarden 
teacher 
drawings 



[81] 



lawyer 

client 

court 

judge 

witness 

fee 

law-books 

Clerk of Court 

Register of deeds 

Tax Collector 

Suit 

Injunction 

Case 



librarian 

books 

lists 

magazines 

Dates 

library ladders 

book cases 



[82] 



lumberman 

lumber 

logs 

lumber camps 

rafts 

saw-mill 

jam 

lumber rolling 

chute 

brand 

pine 

hickory 

chestnut 

hardwood 



machinist 

machinery 

lubrication 

cylinders 

carburetor 

spark plug 

magneto 

oil 

steering wheel 

deferential 

crank shaft 



[39] 



[83] 



market gardner 

garden 

rows 

hill 

vegetable 

hoes 

mattock 

wheelbarrow 

pick 

shovel 

fertilizer 

lettuce 

peas 

radish 

potatoes 

e gg s 
turnips 



meat cook 

meats 

steaks 

hams 

chickens 

turkeys 

fish 

hash 

sausage 

meat pie 

pork chops 

lamb chops 

veal chops 



[84] 



miller 

flour 

flour mill 

meal 

corn 

wheat 

water wheel 

undershot 

overshot 

water power 

grindstone 



milliner 

hats 

millinery store 

trimming 

plumes 

feathers 

f veils 



[85] 



[40] 



miner 

gold 

silver 

copper 

mica 

coal 

iron 

pick axe 

mine 

assayer 

quartz 

hydraulic 

shaft 



mineralogist 

minerals 

sulphur 

Iron 

salt 

gold 

coal 



[86] 



motorman 

motor 

streetcar 

fare 

conductor 

trolley 

track 



newsboy 

newspaper 

customer 

news 

extra 

edition 



power 
fare box 
power box 



[87] 



optician 

eyes 

optics 

glasses 

eyeglasses 

monuclee 

lorgnette 



ornithologist 

bluebird 

blackbird 

nest 

feathers 

e gg s 

jaybird 

robin 

canary 

sparrow 

eagle 



[88] 



painter 

easel 

brush 

model 

paint 

canvas 

picture 

ladder 

lead 



pastry cook 

pastry 

dough 

pudding 

cake 

pies 

chicken pies 

apple pies 

blackbeerry pies 

bread 

biscuits 

crullers 

grape pie 

fruitcake 



[41] 



[89] 



photographer 

camera 

dark room 

print 

pose 

negative 

acid 

developing 

touch 

artist 

picture 

photo 



pianist 
keys 

music rack 
pedals 
music roll 
music 
octave 
note 
touch 
soft pedal 
loud " 
medium " 



[90] 



poultry fancier 

coop 

chickens 

roost 

nest 

domineck 

pullets 

hens 

rooster 

comb 

setting 



printer 

type 

typesetter 

press 

editorial 

sporting column 

news 

black type 

type-machine 



[91] 



proofreader 



ranchman 

cowboy 

calves 

steers 

horses 

brand 

range 

lasso 

round-up 

prairie 

chaps 

spurs 

whip 

gun 



[42] 



[92] 



sailor 

sails 

ships 

deck 

starboard 

larboard 

forward 

stem 

prow 

bow 

hold 

cargo 

masts 

shrouds 

cabin 

bunk 



seamstress 

needle 

thread 

scissors 

seam 

ruffle 

lace 

bobbin 

pleat 

hem 

double-stitch 

sewing 

belt 



port 
porthole 



[93] 



shoemaker 

shoe 

leather 

stitches 

rubber heels 

soles 

shoemakers thread 

" machine 

last 
tacks 
shoe buttons 



soldier 

uniform 

gun 



cartridges 

advance 

retreat 

skirmish 

battle 

battery 

cannon 

cannister 

orders 

march 



[43] 



[94] 



stenographer 

typewriter 

shorthand 

dictate 

type 

ink 

Tanner 
Hides 
bark 
tannery 
cleaning 
tallow 
cow hide 
bull hide 
horse hide 
tan bark 



surveyor 

land 

tract 

timber 

measurements 

surveying instruments 

tax collector 

rate 

assesment 

value 

taxation 

taxes 

mortgage 

property 



C£^D 



[44] 



m 



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/%/</• -^W^ 






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-Qlsh A . -4 *4 ^ ^S^iZr- rsfcLg^+t, &Jt^yi*~£^ ^t*^-^ ^£cT - 








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£Z 



[45] 



[1] 

[(1) Wooley 221 g] [very ornamental] 

Tom Wolfe 1914 English 

[(1) (] A meeting between two dogs. [)] [Look in Wooley to discover mistakes.] 
The other day as I was walking down the street I witnessed an encounter be- 
tween two dogs, a bulldog and a big sheep dog. As soon as the bulldog saw 
the other [(l)]he stopped short and his squat figure seemed fairly to bristle. 
At the same time the sheepdog was going through like demonstrations. His 
long lean figure was stretched tight as a whip cord, and his tongue lolled lan- 
guidly over wicked looking teeth whose pointed teeth tips crunched together 
now and then. Then they commenced circling round one another [,] at the same 
time closing in. All at once there was a flash and the bulldog has his teeth 
sunk deep in the other's throat while the fei sheepdog is knawing (sic) viciously 
at his ear. At last they are separated with much difficulty and the bulldog trots 
off, the victor of a dozen battles.. 



[2] 

[(1) Decide what mistakes you make here as to capitalization. 
Subjects in Section forty-five on which I could write. 

1. A Letter from a friend. 

2. A pocketknife. 

3. Muzzling an Alarm Clock. 

[(1)]4. Finishing the last example in Algebra. 
5. A disagreeable chore. 

Those on which I prefer writing. 

1. The recent death of Senator Bacon. 

2. The value of wireless to the world. 

3. The possibilities of the aeroplane. 

4. The Mexican Situation. 



[46] 



A pair [(2) Wooley 180-279] of Squeaking shoes [(2) 180-279] 

I was very proud of my new, stiff patent-leathers. On Sunday morning I arose 
and started off to Church. As it was, I happened to be late and was obliged 
to walk down to the front row to secure a seat. The choir had just sat down 
and during a lull I made my entrance, so to speak. 



[3] 

I advanced cautiously and put one foot in the aisle, "Squeak." Oh, how hor- 
rified I was and my face was the colour of a beet. But the fatal step had been 
taken and I once more advanced boldly. Oh [,) the seemingly endless length 
of that isle (sic) [ ! ] The congregation tittered and the minister eyed me sternly 
and said in a baleful tone, "Ahem." At last I reached the seat and sank into 
it [,] exhausted. The congregation sat back and sighed after having witnessed 
a [n] interesting tableau but I had no ears for the sermon. 

1. A lively horse. 

2. A row on the river. [Where should 

3. A visit to the beach. capitals be used 

4. Learning to ride a bicycle. here?] 

5. Learning to swim. 



[4] 

I received my first glimpse of the Atlantic at Palm Beach, Florida. A half mile 
off one might hear the breakers and feel the sea-breeze fan your hair. The (sic) 
all of a sudden you catch a glimpse of the briny through the palms and a 
moment later come unto a great evenly sloping beach with the bathers diving 
and splashing all around. As my time was limited at Palm Beach I was not 
able to go into the surf but at Daytona Beach I had one of the most pleasurable 
experiences of my life. To feel the cool waves and to have a big breaker pick 
you up and deposit you a few feet away. There is nothing like salt water 
bathing. 



[47] 



The Panama Canal 

We are nearing the completion of the most magnificant engineering feat 
in history, 



[5] 

[(1) Spell. (2) What do you mean? (3) Is it necessary to repeat this?] 

the glory of it being doubled in the knowledge that our government bought 
it from another great country, when that country had failed. The work has 
lured the thirty-thousand men who to-day are putting their concentrated efforts 
into the completion of the "Big Ditch." And threw [(1)] it all there has been 
one man who has had the gigantic task [(Jsolely in his hand[) (2) (]and who 
[(3)] has overseered the work as no other, perhaps, could. [)] He seems to be 
the man who is most fitted for this position. This man is Colonel Goethals. 
Speaking of a feature of the Canal, on as trip from New York to San Francisco, 
one saves a exactly nine-thousand-five hundred ninety miles. So we see the 
tremendous possibilities suggested by the Canal. But above all we must honor 
Colonel Goethals whose name will go down in history. 

[6] 

[(1) Wooley 221 b] 

[(]A Peep into the future[)] [???] 

Last year in 1952[,] business called me to Paris. Our air-packet left at 8:30 p.m. 
So going through the streets of our great metropolis with its seventeen-million 
inhabitants I came at last to the quay of the Royal Prince mail-packet company. 
I met my friend [(1)] the captain and at once climbed into the cabin of our 
liner. Ah, what a difference between today and yesterday. Think of those days 
in 1915 when a man took his life in his hands to ride in a (sic) aeroplane and 
now think of the magnificant air-liners that give international rapid transit. The 
captain looked from the window to where a big grey liner was sinking slowly 



[48] 



to it's (sic) moorings. "This will never do," he said, "that is the Calcutta packed 
(sic) and it is twenty minutes late." Now is the time for a departure. We go 
on deck 



[7] 

and see the myriad lights of the greatest of cities fade behind. Forming a sil- 
houette against the sky is the one-hundred twenty story Metropolis bank build- 
ing. We are now making a sixteen second mile. But no, that is not enough 
and in a few minutes it is reduced to thirteen seconds. We reach our level of 
sixty-five hundred feet and as I am tired I retire. In the morning when I come 
on deck we see Havre in the distance and a« little later on we dock at Paris. 

Tom Sawyer 

Tom Sawyer lived in a country town. 

He was a boy . 

He was a bad boy. 

But he did not do mean, petty, tricks. 

He was mischievous. 

He was superstitious. 

He had ambitions the same as any other boy. 



[8] 

Tom Sawyer is without doubt the greatest piece of juvenile literature ever 
written. Tom was a boy the same as any other, his mental faculties were not 
any better and he might have been any boy. His superstitions were connected 
with "hants" and with stump water and dead cats being a cure for warts if 
the remedy was applied at aay the right time with the magic words said over 
the stump or the cat. His ambitions were to be a pirate or a bandit bold or 
to go treasure hunting. Being of a venturesome spirit he went pirating down 
the river to an island two miles below. During this period he learned to smoke 
a pipe and the returned home to the wonder of all his companions. A little 
later on he discovered treasure, as the fates would have it and was looked up 
to as a rich boy. 



[49] 



[9] 



News Section. 
Deaths 
Suicides 

Automobile Races 
War News 
Aviation News 
Tariff News 

Sporting Section 
Boxing 
Baseball 
Football 

Amusement Section 
Comic Section. 
Jokes 
Anecdotes. 

Editorial Section 

Political Criticisms. 
Reviews of Reviews. 



[10] 

I was born October 3rd, 1900 and there begins the story of my existence. In 
1904 I went to the w[W]orld's Fair and stayed there seven months. At the 
age of five I was sent to school and in in (sic) month or so learned the Rudi- 
ments of reading and writing. At eleven I started to school with a gentlemen 
(sic) by the name of Roberts and for the past two years have been going to 
the school of same. Here my brief existence and manuscript must close as I 
am not a futurist and therefore cannot continue. 
[You might have been a "Pasterite," and told more of your early life.] 



[50] 



A short cut 



A band of boys on the top of the hill. 

A fire at the bottom. 

The pellmell rush to the bottom 

The trip and tumble of all. 

An Amusing scene. 



[11] 



A Young Protector. 



A man and child on the car. 

The childs troubled mien. 

Its anxious inquiry. 

A reassuring glance. 

Their destination. 

The once again happy child. 

An old Friend. 

The purpose of the writer is to convey a description of his friend to the reader. 
The choice of details serves his purpose. 
His plan is to interest the reader. 

Why I like my school life. 

I like the teachers. 

I like the manner of instruction. 

I like the pupils. 

I like the school ground and buildings. 

I like the association as a general thing. 



[51] 



[12] 

I am a pupil of the North State Fitting School and shall explain the reasons 
why I prefer it to other schools I have gone to. I like the fairness and the justice 
meted out by the teachers and I have a personal regard for them. I like espe- 
cially well the student life body as they are all fine boys. The manner of instruc- 
tion is new and novel, the lessons often being suggested by the pupils. On 
Fridays the literary society meets and we spend an enjoyable afternoon. The 
school-house is set far back in a grove of oaks of several acres and is situated 
on a high hill. There is ample ground afforded for recreation and we spend 
an enjoyable time. There is not one thing around or about the school that I 
dislike and I therefore spend and enjoyable time. 



[13] 

My plan is to demonstrate why I like my school life. 
I think the choice of details serves my purpose. 
My plan is to interest my readers. 

A g[G]limpse of the President. 

I have in my life seen two Presidents within the lapse of an hour. At the 
Inauguration at Washington, last March, I saw President Taft riding on the 
way to the w-h Capitol with the President to be, Woodrow Wilson. Taft rode 
on the right hand side of the carriage. An hour later, coming back, I saw Presi- 
dent Wilson and Ex[ ?] President Taft but this time the Ex[.] President rode on 
the left hand side, whe (sic) the President rode on the right. The (sic) drove 
on and were soon lost to my sight. 



[14] 



Why I came to this school. 

I came to this school becaus (sic) I thought I could learn more here. Also 
I like the grounds, the building and the location. I also liked the teachers and 



[52] 



resolved to buckle down to work and study. I am glad that I came here because 
I found that I was not mistaken and could learn more here. [Well, don't do 
all your German and other work at sight.] 

Ten things I have done in the past twenty-four hours. 

1. Ate Supper. 

2. Went to bed. 

3. Woke up. 

4. Dressed. 

5. Read 

6. Ate Dinner 

7. Took a walk. 

8. Brought up kindling 



[15] 



9. Had Supper 

10. Read. 



How I went to Bed. 



First I yawned which was a gentle reminder of the sand-man's approach. 
The (sic), slowly and with a sigh I mounted the stairs to my room. Sinking 
slowly onto the bed I took off my shoes, then, next my waist and tie. After 
this I divested myself of my trousers and was then ready for bed. 

Chap. 1. Ex. 1 1 paragraph 

Am able to divide. 

Chap. 1. Ex 2 and 3. Can connect. 

Selections from The Old Testament Suitable for independent paragraphs. 

The sending of quails and manna. 
The Sweetening of the waters 
The plague of hail. 



[53] 



[16] 



The waters turned to blood. 
Sampson's riddle. 



Subjects suitable for short Themes. 

How I built my tool-chest. 

Description of my Christmas presents. 

Description of the school and grounds of the North State Fitting School. 

The Lord tells [told] Moses that the Lord it is useless to use gentle arguments 
with Pharaoh, for his heart is was hardened against the Israelites. And the lord 
placed his power in Moses, and Moses stood by the river brink and waved his 
rod over the turbulent waters. 

And lo, the waters turned red the rivers ran blood. And the fish died, while 
the natives 



[17] 

dared not drink of the polluted waters. And there was blood throughout all 
Egypt. And the power of the magicians availed not. And seven days passed after 
the Lord had smitten the river. 

The School Day. 

In the morning after chapel, my first study is English. On Monday we 
have the "Hanson," and the rest of the week is occupied by "Bible Stories." 
One period usually lasts forty-five minutes. 

After this call, I have Eeg Caesar, which also occupies forty-five minutes. 
We have on the average ten lines [(1) Should be reading a page by now.] of 
Caesar a day. Many times however we decline and conjugate words and give 
the rule for case. 



[54] 



[18] 

After this is a study period and then recess at half-past eleven. 

After recess I have algebra [,] a forty-five minute call. The period is mostly 
board work and the explaining of examples. 

The next period is filled jointly by Spelling and Writing, both of which 
are very easy studies. This call takes up forty-five minutes after which we have 
a half-hour recess. 

My last lesson of the day is directly after recess. Then I have German. This 
is a forty-five minute period but the time is passed very pleasantly because of 
the easiness of the translation. One half-hour later we dismiss. 



[19] 



/Aims, -ty^t^LP ^u^Xk. ^u zJ 1 s&£c 



yL&^i^jsistL' 




■ ^f <4>* /ZtsUs&^C^ 












[20] 



The Mexican Situation. 

Fellow students: We are on the verge of a great international crisis, nay- 
even more, we are on the verge of a war. Now, therefore it behooves us to 
look at both sides of the question. So, do not let your patriotic sentiments and 
your fiery temper get the best of you, but look at the question with common 
good sense. First [ , J we will make a review of the wrongs committed on our 
government and upon our flags by the Mexicans. 

Over one-hundred and fifty of our citizens have met death directly or 
indirectly by the Mexicans. Moreover they have presumed to entice one of our 
Texas cattlemen has b ee n e ntic e d over the border. There they hung him and 
his body was horribly mutilated. 



[55] 



[21] 



Then we will take the case of the British subject, Benton. 

This crime [,]or rather mystery [,] has assumed [(l)Look up this word.] 
many causes for suspicion. According to Villa, Benton, a wealthy English cattle- 
man [, ] threatened his life. Villa was corroborated in his statements by several 
audiences [ ? ] of officers. He also claims that Benton was tried by court martial 
and executed afterward. But the causes for suspicion are these [ : ] the body was 
found on February 17th, while news of the court martial was not made public 
till the 21st. In the meanwhile [,] the officers and privates protested ignorance 
of the whole affair. Now, therefore, although England is not going to be hasty, 
it is plain that she will demand a full explanation. Also the burial ground of 
the body was not (Editor's Note: An arrow indicates that this sentence should follow 
the one above ending in "affair.") 



[22] 

revealed until February 27th. It is thought that this was done with the view 
of effacing all traces of how Benton died [ , ] as the bodies decay quickly in this 
climate. 

Huerta has impudently refused many demands of the government, indeed 
he has demanded those troops of his that retreated across the border. To concede 
to these demands would be a wholly unprecedented thing. Villa has boastfully 
declared that in a few weeks the capitol will be his. But if we will only remem- 
ber that Villa is now almost eight-hundred miles from the capitol and also the 
Federal troops are gathering strength as they slowly retreat we may draw other 
conclusions. However [ , ] Huerta is straining every faculty to meet his financial 



[23] 

demands. Indeed, only last week he diverted the custom-house receipts over 
to his own relief. 

But the affair is greatly complicated. Huerta claims to be as strong as ever 
while on the other hand the Insurgents have been victors in three battles and 



[56] 



claim to have two-million five hundred thousand dollars (supposedly obtained 
from forced loans on banks) with which to carry on their battles. 

To intervene with Mexico would be far more serious than the rebellion 
of the Cuban Insurgents. There we had a few hundred thousand men,[;] here 
we have a powerful country of fourteen million inhabitants to cope with. How- 
ever we can be thankful that we have such 



[24] 

an efficient man for the head of the government. He is remaining neutral until 
it is absolutely neseesary to intervene. We should uphold this man in all his 
rulings and remain a reinforcement for whatever decree he makes. 

Baseball is my favorite game because it is full of excitement. With two 
men on bases, the score tied, two men out and three balls and two strikes on 
the batter, this is truly a hair-raising time. The batter is between two points,[;] 
he either gets a hit or his base on balls or he fans out. It is in my mind[,] 
the only radical sport for Americans[,] whose chief food is excitement. 



[25] 

I like my friend because he is unassuming, plain[,] witty and honest. He 
is a country boy, never loses his temperf,] is a dry humorist[,] and is contin- 
ually chaffing (sic) his companions. At home he usually spends his time hunting 
and thinks his own particular section the finest in the world. 

At school he is to be found always on the school grounds at recess time 
except when he is eating soup. He is a good scholar and has the capacity for 
always getting out on time. 



one minute talks 



Th 



ernes 



A g[G]ypsy c[C]amp 
A p[p]rinting o[0]ffice 
A c[C]row 
A h[H]ouse a[A]qarium 



[sic 



A r[R]obin 
Lorna Doone 
A m[M]ilkman 



[57] 



[26] 



A printing office. 



The first view of the printing office. 

The presses. 

The written pamphlets. 

The method of preparations. 

The type. 

Theme on Treasure Island. 

The boy who tells the Story. 
The map of Treasure Island. 
The Preparation and the Ship. 
Description of the sailorrs (sic) 
The mutiny a[A]board. 
The f [Fjight on the i[I]sland. 
The f[F]inding of the t [Treasure. 
The r[R]eturn h[H]ome. 

Sec. 84. A Trip to Craggy. 

The trail leading up to Craggy is but an introduction of [ ? ] the pleasures 
to come. Cool green verdure line[s] the way while tinkling waterfalls ring 
musically 



[27] 

in your ears. Ice cold water bubbles frothing from little springs and the harmless 
littl (sic) green snakes run across your path. At last you come upon a rolling 
plain with little growth. Looking about you, one sees other mountains dwarfed 
by comparison and then you know that you are on c[C]raggy. 

[Please number your exercises. Your worked (sic) much improved in neatness. 
You omit part of the lesson.] 



[58] 



[28] 

The Creation. 

In the beginning there was God and God created every living thing. And 
first he created the earth but it was without form and void. And the Lord cre- 
ated a firmament and called it heaven. And he separated the waters from the 
land. And the verdure [( ]and everything green[ )] and last of all he created man. 
And he called the man Adam. And Adam lived in Eden and the lord gave him 
a mate whom he called woman. 

The Fall. 

And the Lord forbade Adam to partake of the Tree of Life. But Eve was 
tempted and she partook and Adam partook also and they were driven out from 



[29] 

the Garden. 

The Flood. 

The world was getting very wicked and the Lord decided to destroy it. 
But there were eight people who were to be saved,[;] these were Noah and 
his family. And Noah built the Ark. The Flood came and it rained forty days 
and nights. And Noah was delivered. 

The Patriarchal Age. 

Noah, Ja Abraham 1921, Isaac 1822, Joseph and Esau and Joseph (sic). 
Joseph was sold into captivity in Egypt and became a powerful man there and 
he died. His descendant (sic) lived in Egypt and the twelve sons of the family 
of Jacob formed the tribes of Israel. 



[59] 



[30] 

They were oppressed in Egypt and and (sic) Moses led them into the Promised 
land. The journey took forty years. Moses died in sight of the Promised Land. 
Joshua was appointed leader in his place and victory came always to the Hebrews. 
There was War among the tribes for many years in which Sampson was hero. 
At last the country was firmly established and Saul of Tarsus (period of Kings 
1095-1013) is annointed king but he and his sons are killed in battle and David 
is made king. He commits a sin in killing Uriah so that he might possess his 
wife. Absalom [ , ] his son [ , ] is killed in battle against his father. 



[31] 

Solomon is next king and rules his country wisely and well. The kingdom 
is divided into two Judah and Israel and last from 975 to 588 (Judah) and from 
975 to 721 (Israel). Then Nebuchanezzar (sic), King of Babylon [,] bring them 
as captives into his kingdom. His favorite is Daniel a young Hebrew. Daniel 
interprets many dreams and lives through Belshazzar's reign and thro' that of 
Darius and Cyrus who grants them liberty and they go back into Jerusalem 
and build a wall. They are again captured and are brought into Persia but Esther, 
a young Jewess gains favor in the king's eye and the Jews are granted liberty 
and go to Jerusalem 



[32] 

again. The Jews are scattered all over the world and some few in Jerusalem 
but they are all true to their religion 

[Excellent in words, but pretty badly disfigured as to penmanship.] 



[60] 



[33] 



English Composition 

If for example each of these topics P 45. Ex. 28. 

If your outline interest to the end P. 34. 

Franklin then arose and they obeyd P. 33 Franklin's Toast. 

John is sick and so is James, so you may go to see them if you do your work well. 

George is going to town and Tom is also, if you hurry you may go, providing 

you do your work well. 

If I go, [& if you go] James will -g o and [too] so is John. 

To-day I went to the circus. The tents were all up and in one of them I saw 

ihai some elephants. The cooks were getting supper ready. 



[34] 

My cousin sent me a letter from the Phillipines, where he is with his company. 
He told me that on his way to the islands they encountered a heavy storm, 
which carried them nearly to Japan. The ship was wrecked, and they lost nearly 
all their food, clothing, and personal property. 

Years afterward, the knowledge stood me in good stand in clearing up another 
mystery. It was a lumber camp — always a superstitious place — in the heart of 
a Canadian Forest. I had followed a wandering herd of caribou too far one day, 
and late in the afternoon found myself alone at a river, some twenty miles from 
camp. 



[35] 

o[0]n the edge of the barren grounds somewhere above me, I knew that a 
crew of lumbermen were at word (sic); so I headed up river to find their camp, 
if possible, and avoid sleeping out in the snow and bitter cold. It was long 
after dark, and the moon was flooding forest and river with a wonderful light, 
when I at last caught sight of the camp. The click of my snowshoes brough 



[61] 



(sic) a dozen big men to the door. At that moment I felt, rather than saw, 
that they seemed troubled and alarmed at seeing me alone; but I was too tired 
to to (sic) notice, and no words save those of welcome were spoken until I had 
eaten heartily. Then, as I started out for a look at the wild beauty of the place 
under the moonlight, a lumberman followed 



[36] 

and touched me on the shoulder. 

I had one of my teeth extracted yesterday. It was my first experience with the 
dentist and I experienced only slight qualms of fear. However when I was on 
the chair and felt the gentle but firm grasp of the dentist as he forced me down, 
I realized my doom was sealed. It was over in a minute. He pressed the needdle 
(sic) into my gums and then with an evil looking pair of plyers extracted a 
two pronged tooth. 

Asheville, N.C. 
March 30th, 1914. 

Dear Mrs. Roberts, — 

English is very hard and I wish you to shorten my lessons. Co[-] operate, 
if you are my friend and I am 



[37] 



yours — 

(Apologies to Benj. Franklin) 



Tom Wolfe. 



Asheville, N.C. 
March 30th, 1914. 



Dear Mrs. Roberts — 

Will you shorten my English lessons as they are hard. [(1)] 

Sincerelyf , ] 
Tom Wolfe. 



[62] 





,..*?. <£. 

- &u*£.jzJ??Z/Jbii. 



&/<~^£^U^ ^tt&te^ 










M%<JLmJ' J <U^f^<L fiAJL^ TU^J-^^uA 



[63] 



Desha asks [ifj would [if] the teacher [would] shorten the lesson. 

[(1) Not until you learn to use the interrogation mark. 
The last pages are neat — but — those others.] 



[38 - blank] 

[39] 

[Tom Wolfe, turn to Wooley, 179-180, and study till it burns your eye balls.] 

Fire. 

The two prize men of the prize force of the New York Police Department 
were "Baldy" Flynn and Jim Corbett. Flynn was short, stout and enormously 
strong. Corbett was tall, well-built and also strong. Consequently they were 
fereindly (sic) rivals for honors. 

One day a hurry call came in with the news that a paint and oil place 
was afire. When they got there it was found that the building was doomed 
to destruction. The extension ladders found their way to the top and Flynn 
and Corbett got to work with the axes. There was a frightened scream. 



[40] 

Flynn looked down and perceived a white faced young girl on the floor below 
him. His duty was clear. Corbitt looked at him and there was mute assent in 
his eyes. 

Flynn crept over the parapet. Corbett grasped each foot and the pendulam 
(sic) swung down. He grasped the girl in his outstretched arms and called 
Corbitt to pull up. The terrific strain told on both of them. Slowly they neared 
the roof and at last the girl scrambled to safety. Flynn rolled over and looked 
up into Corbett's face. With intensest agony depicted on his face he he (sic) 
whispered to Corbett, 



[64] 



[41] 

"Something broke, I couldn't stand it. Good bye Jim and. . . .God bless you." 
[Fine story finely told by a fine boy] 

[42] 

The Politician. 

Louis enters the hall. He reprimands Quentin for allowing Louis of Orleans 
to enter against his commands. Joan is just recovering from her swoon and the 
king with quiet sarcasm scolds the Duke for being too ardent in his court . 
Countess of Croye and the Lady Isabelle are in the room. They disperse and 
the king sends for his counsellor, Oliver. The (sic) strike upon a plan of marry- 
ing the young Countess Isabelle to some powerful noble, thus averting their 
trouble with Burgundy and also increasing their own power. Oliver suggests 
the young Duke of Gueldres as a suitable husband but Louis 



[43] 

raises his hands in horror and (sic) marrying a pure young lady to a black- 
hearted fiend. His suggestion however is even worse. He suggests William de 
La Marck who is even a worse man than Gueldres. La Marck is a powerful 
robber baron and the king thinks he could offer strong resistance to Burgundy 
if need be. The king suggests sending the two ladies off with Quentin as a 
guide. The robber will have been notified and will capture them when they 
drive through his forest. Quentin will probably be killed but this matters little 
to the king if it betters his plans. The ladies are told that (sic) are to be sent 
home and it is needless to say that they are glad. 



[65] 



(Editor's Note: Many blank pages, then this entry:) 



[44] 

I think it possible for Jack to go to town, and Jill to go with him, if he will 
do his work; if she will wash the dishes; then it is possible for all of us to 
go to-gether. 



<^£D 



[66] 





"Wot 




/ . ^ . Si - 1 y V J /> 




[67] 



(Editor's Note: The following "treatise" is laid in the front of the 1915 notebook and 
is written in pencil on the hack of some word lists that appear to be written by a younger 
Tom Wolfe. "Horty" is probably Hortense Pattison, who taught algebra, a subject in 
which Wolfe did not do well.) 

[i] 

A Treatise on the Subject of "Horty" 
Read this: this is good 

Thomas Wolfe is Soliloquizing 

To go, or not to go that is the question 

Whether 'tis nobler in the the (sic) mind to suffer 

The slings and arrows of outrageous "Horty" 

Or to take arms against her ego 

And by oppossing end it. 

To go. To go to the picture show, I must not. Horty says no. She approves 

it not. She says it stunts my stature. Oh, Heavens, why was I born to be a 

runt. Why is it that after 15 years on this universe I stand only 6 ft. 2. Why 

oh why am 

[ii] 

I not an athlete like the deceased Mr. Pattison, who was 7 feet tall and weighed 
almost 90 lbs. Yet I must do as Horty says. Tho I have known her for only 
6 months, I have become a slave to her magnetic personality, her exquisite little 
side burns and goatee and lastly but not leastly to her marvellous, nay uncanny 
sense of deduction. Oh, most remarkable Horty. You are wiser than the Hon. 
Jas. J. Britt who is only a poor stick of a Congressman. I know you are because 
you said so. Thos. A 

[Hi] 

Edison, you say, is without inventive genius. Any fool could have done what 
he has done. When I asked you why you did not deprive him of his glory 
you replied that you were no fool. 



[68] 



Rather deep, Horty, rather deep. You are qualified to teach any subject 
under the golden sun, the blue horizon, the gilded firmament. Without the 
slightest hesitation you would teach Chinese. On your own testimony you are 
the wisest woman on the globe 



[iv] 

Therefore it must be so. 

In addition to all these splendid qualities you are qualified to pass over 
the theories of the greatest men ever created in the tide of times and to form 
your own conclusions. Without ever looking at any article you can e x (such 
as a pocket book) you can express an opinion as to just what kind of material 
as it is. Furthermore you possess a wonderful open mind which you received 
at college. Oh, Horty, was ever fair woman as perfect as (Editor's Note: The 
remaining text on this page is torn off.) 



[v] 

mother who has kept her two angelic daughters from the contaminating influ- 
ence of a screwdriver. This is rather deep. Perhaps young Philip Rogers and 
young Munsey Roberts will explain. Oh, Horty, you are the most beloved of 
teachers. Whenever you arise to orate the whole school breaks into a sponta- 
neous and universal cheer. When I go to college I intend to carry a picture 
of Horty with me. While I burn the midnight oil, tis oft that I will glance 



[vi] 

at her beautiful features, in which the lights of modesty and wisdom are so 
well commingled that they form in a grand, glorious, harmonic conception 
of the world's most perfect female. As I look at this inspiring portrait I will 
say, "Look what education did for Horty." 

The next day I quit school and go to work heaving bricks. 
Oh wad some power the giftee gie us— To see ourselves as others see us 



[69] 



[1] 

A Brutal Deed and a Lasting Memory. 

1. 

Circumstances alter cases. 

Altho Miss Cavell was a spy, she betrayed none of Germany's secrets but rather 
helped the wounded and distressed of both nations impartially. The womans 
brutality nobility [ ? ] and the horror and brutality of Germany's crime will long 
be remembered. 

2. 

Altho Woman's Suffrage has been defeated in several states[,] the tremendous 
votes cast for it, for instance 500,000 in New Yorkf , ] is indicative of the irresistible, 
rushing wave of equal suffrage. 

3. 

After more than a year of war we find the choicest literature in the trenches. 
All cheap, trashy stories have been discarded and we find the humblest private 
reading choice selections from Lincoln, Shelley, Milton, etc. This is printed on 
a cheap "broadsheet" which sells six for a penny. 

(over) 



[2] 

4. 

The glory of war is a thing of the past. No more terrific hand to hand struggles, 
no idolized leader at the front of his troops cheering them to victory. Instead 
a shell bursts and those little spots of brown or grey are still. Even the siege 
of a city is made at a distance of ten or twelve miles. 



The Shame of Yale. 

Five students of Yale received free board in lieu for their athletic services at a 
small resort last summer. They are branded as "professional athletes." A man, 



[70] 



however, in a great university who makes study his avocation and athletics his 
vocation is a professional athlete. 

6. 

The brave stand Serbia is making against her iron ring of enemys (sic) with 
the allies rushing to her aid, is a thrilling incident of the war. Germany and 
Austria occupy her attention at one front while at the other Bulgaria stabs her 
in the back (as Sir Edward Grey says). 



[3] 

7. 

Greece remains neutral in spite of bribes by the a[A]llies. According to a treaty 
with Serbia[ , ] Greece is obligated to come to her aid with 150,000 men. But 
Greece takes the stand that 150,000 troops would be of small benefit when at 
least 400 000 are necessary. 

II. Why Suffrage failed in New Jersey 

Suffrage failed in New Jersey last week altho it received the support of Woodrow 
Wilson, President of the United States. This was expected for several reasons. 
In New Jersey as well as in many state (sic) there is a large body of women 
who are by nature lazy and indolent and who do not wish to change the old 
order. These are by nature antis. Again the corrupt grafters and experienced 
politicians form a powerful combination against suffrage. Thirdly the influence 
of a powerful church is against it. These powers have beaten suffrage. But the 
powerful stand point (sic) to the handwriting on the wall, the inevitable hour. 



[4] 

Six news items. 

1. 

Serbia is invaded on three sides by Germany, Austria and Bulgaria. The Allies 
are rushing aid to her supply with all possible speed. The Balkans hold the 
attention of the world. 



[71] 



2. 

Greece remains neutral in spite of threats from England and her obligations 

to Serbia. 

3. 

Miss Edith Cavell, a British Red Cross Nurse was shot on the charge of espion- 
age, by Germany, Oct. 12th. The deed aroused great indignation and raised 
the enlistment rates in England 10,000. 

[This is the best-looking work you have done, but you have not done what 
I called for.] 

(Editor's Note: The following comments are also in Wolfe's handwriting but with a 
different pen.) 

1. Failed to dot "I" 
Comma left out 

Capital "A". 



[5] 

Hamlet. (Character Sketch) 

I do not think Hamlet was unfitted for the great task to which he was 
assigned. I shall always think of him as a strong, forceful character, who made 
sure of each step before he took it. 

He was a thinker. This is shown by his frequent soliloquies in which he 
mentally debates the rights or wrongs of matters. He was intensely reverent. 
This is shown in "To be, or not to be" in which he contemplates self-destruction 
were it not against Gods Law's (sic). The vital question throughout the play 
is whether the madness was real or pretended. I think it was pretended. "For 
I will put an antic spirit on" "Ay, a crafty madness." Hamlet's reasoning was 
too logical to originate from an insane mind. 

He says in one place: "The time is out of joint, O Cursed Spite 
That ever I was born to set it right." He sets it right 



[72] 



[6] 

carrying out his terrible plan of revenge, without a single deviation. This is 
entirely to (sic) sane for an insane man. I think Hamlet's mind was stricken 
with horror and grief but never with insanity. 

[I will not grade this until it is properly put in your book. 
Prepare Monday's Comp. lesson. 
Get some paper.] 



[7] 



Four Cartoons by Louis Raemaekers 

The beuty (sic), pathos or awfullness expressed by M. Raemaekers have 
seldom if ever been reproduced by any other cartoonist. Since the war has af- 
forded him ample themes for his stricken people (the Belgians) many master- 
pieces have come forth from his pen. 



The Mothers. [Proper place for a title?] 

They are veiled in black, are dressed in black, old and young. It is at the 
war-office. The officer has just read the names of their sons killed in battle. 
Here is an old grey-haired mother, her kindly, time worn face is wreathed in 
agony, not tears, it is that sorrow which robs one of their last relief. A younger 
mother is swaying back and forth with clasped hands and closed eyes. "Madam, 
his majesty was well pleased." 



When War has passed By. 

Their (sic) lies the ruins of their cottage — a humble one, but still a home dear 
to them. Shell and fire have wrought havoc and 

(over) 



[73] 



[8] 

ruin and destruction is all to be seen. The supreme tragedy is the mother and 
child lying stark in death on the ground. 

"Kreuzland, Kreuzland, Uber Alles" 

The German war song is "Deutschland, Deutschland, uber alles" The high 
military crosses of the dead strew the field. In a wide arc between the crosses, 
thousands of orphans are marching, chanting "Where are our fathers lying?" 

Christmas Day! 

This is a biblical reference of the time when the three wise men journeyed to 
see the Christ. These three men Hypocrisy, Manslaughter, and Despotism are 
offering up gifts of a cross, a cup of blood and a sceptre to Christianity, in 
order to buy their justification. 

[Very good work, but poorly arranged on the page.] 



[9] 

(Editor's Note: Pages 9 and 10 are put into the notebook incorrectly, apparently by Wolfe. 
See Mrs. Roberts's comment, "to where?" after Wolfe's "over" at the end of this page.) 

T. C. Wolfe 



Cartoons. 

On Dec. 11, 1915, Lord Derby turned in his accounts for inspection. If 
the enlistment rates are sufficient England will stand in favor of its present sys- 
tem, — if not she must resort to conscription. In the first cartoon the rotund 
gentleman John Ball talking (sic) to his twin John Bull. He is quoting Nelson's 
famous statement "England expects—" he stops — shall he substitute "compels" 
for "expects." The second cartoon expresses the same idea. John Ball walks by 
with lowered head while Lloyd George erases "expects" and substitutes "compels." 



[74] 



Asheville recently had a five inch fall of snow. To have fallen in so short a time 
this is the heaviest snow for many years. Viewing snow in a poetic light snow 
is a beautiful thing. A dreamy-eyed poet in a well-heated 

(over) [to where?] 



[10] 

room right s writes beautiful poetry about the beautiful snow. But viewing it 
in a practical manner, how do the great mass of people, the laboring class view 
it. [?] To them it is a cold, wet, slushy mess, which breeds cold and discom- 
fort. Are you a poet or a laborer. What do you think? 

William Dean Howells. [Proper place for title?] 

He has just had the title of Dean of American Letters bestowed upon him. 
He was born at Martin's Ferry, Ohio, in 1837, was United States Consul at 
Venice from 1861 to 1865. From 1872 to 1881 he was editor of the Atlantic 
Monthly. Soon afterward he began to devote his time to novel-writing. Chief 
among his works are "The Lady of the Aroostook," "A Modern Instance," and 
"A Fearful Responsibility." He has written lives of Lincoln and Hayes, "Modern 
Italian Poets" and some poems. 



[11] 



Hammering Hindenburg. 

The Napoleon of the Great World War, as regards genius and military 
strategy, is the great German Rock of Gibralter, —Von Hindenburg. Time after 
time he has hurled the mighty Russian hordes back from Prussia, with lightning 
movements he has executed gigantic manouvres (sic) and saved his country from 
invasion. In times of peril and extreme danger the German People look to 
Hindenburg, the firm, solid rock upon which they have builded their hopes. 

It is little wonder they admire and even adore him. The empire therefore 
has decided to turn his popularity to profit and have erected a gigantic wooden 
statue of the German War Lord. It is proposed that each patriot shall be per- 



[75] 



mitted to drive an iron nail in the warrior for every subscription of one mark, 
a silver one for five marks and a gold one for ten marks are or over. 

(over) 



[12] 

And as the fighter looks down, a smile on his rocky, craggy features, vast hordes 

of patriotic Germans are busily "hammering Hindenburg." 

[Excellent] 



To the "Day" 
[Ex. Why did you not do this?] 

[I have graded your last paper, unless you get paper and put it in properly, 
and follow my directions. Pegasus must be controlled, even tho by one of a 
lower order who has no wings.] 

(The following two pages are out of order in the notebook but have been put into correct 
order here for clarity.) 

[13] 

Another Foolish Dream. Thos. Wolfe 

I had just finished reading a current magazine on the preparedness build 
bill. The Secretary of War was advocating an army of one and one-half million 
men. The navy department was advocating another enormous increase. It was 
Dec. 24th — Christmas Eve. 

The book dropped from my hand and I dozed off into a sleep. And then 
I dreamed. I dreamt of the countries fighting in Europe, of the awful waste, 
of the enormous slaughter. I dreamt of America across the sea with her broad, 
smiling fields and her busy, prosperous cities. I saw the munition factories and 
steamers carrying contraband of war to Europe. In short I saw our prosperity 
"coined out of Europe's agony." 



[76] 







%■ ~M}~k^p, stL&tO /Usirus yto-4- /&bd 

& Xs&~^r-t> 0^7-^lJ ^tW sL&-^4' /& eo^pf 

/i 

If 



[77] 



And then I dreamed of peace. (It was such a ridiculous dream, of course.) 
The Allies had forced the Teutons to surrender. A binding, lasting peace was 
formed and Europe started to retrieve it's (sic) lost fortunes and civilizations. 



[14] 

The U.S. advocated a conference at the Hague and voted one-billion dollars 
for preparedness for peace. Half a billion went for the ruined countries, the 
other half for civilization and peace. At an enormous meeting in Trafalgar Square 
the entire British Army deposited their arms under the monument of Nelson. 
At the Invalides the French Army did the same. Up "Unter den Linden" 
marched the Teuton Hordes and deposited their weapons under the statue of 
the great Frederic. 

In Washington our army disarmed in front of the Army and Navy Depart- 
ment. Peace was complete. The world was free from the bonds that had drained 
her from the beginning of time. And then I awoke from that ridiculous, foolish, 
collossal (sic) dream. 

2. 

Training our Youth for Defense. 

Geo. E. Chamberlain has introduced a bill into the Senate which calls for a 
cadet corps of boys between 



[15] 

3. 

twelve and seventeen years of age and a continental or citizens army between 
eighteen and twenty-three. This is compulsory. A certain amount of training, 
namely, 120. hours a year is continued for 6 years. Altho' not nearly approaching 
the German system, this savors too much of militarism and is not at all in 
accordance with our constitution and which allows us "life, liberty and the 
pursuit of happiness. 



[78] 



American Barons 

Ye seen yon birkie ca'd a lord, 
Wha struts, an' stares, an' a' that 
Tho' hundreds worship at his word, 
He's but a coof for a' that. 

An American millionaire, who has made untold millions from the people of 
his mother country has figuratively "spit in his mother's face" 
The man— William Waldorf Astor has betaken himself and his millions from 
this country 

(over) 



[16] 

and become a naturalized Englishman. Moreover, with aforesaid millions he 
has purchased a title and is now an American Baron. 

Which is the better — to have stayed in this country and become a noble- 
man in the true sense of the word or to have become one in name only. His 
name is now an object of ridicule among his fellow countrymen and among 
the men of ef his adopted land. 

"It is neither manliness, sense nor grace 

For a son to spit in his mother's face." 

(Editor's Note: The following comments are also in Wolfe's handwriting but with a 
different pen.) 

Title in wrong place. 
"Writes" instead of "rights." 
"One-Hundred-twenty" instead of 120 
"American Barons" in wrong place 
"Another Foolish Dream" " " 



[79] 



(Editor's Note: The next three pages are inserted into Wolfe's notebook incorrectly. They 
are in the correct order here.) 



[17] 



The Triumph of the Man Who Acts. 

A. This is the day of the man who acts. 

1. The world respects him. 

2. People desire him. 

B. Health attends the man who acts. 

1. Invalids are invalids because of their lack of action. 

C. Wisdom guides the man who acts. 

1. If it were not for action people would still be ignorant. 

2. All things have been found out by action. 

D. Hope frees the man who acts. 

1. He is bold, fearless, free. 

E. Joy helps the man who acts. 

1. A life work is the only joy. 

F. D. (sic) Power moves the man who acts. 

1. Great deeds are the products of great desires. 

G. Progress marks the man who acts. 

1. We never become great by thinking ourselves so. 
H. Fame follows the man who acts. 
I. Wealth rewards the man who acts. 
J. Love chooses the man who acts. 
K. The man of action is the hero. 

L. Immortality crowns the man who acts. Napoleon, Caesar, Washington, 
Lincoln 



[80] 



[18] 



English IV Thomas C. Wolfe 

1* General Bathos was an immigrant in the Boer War, who is now leading 
Britain's Soldiers in South Africa. 

2.* Poincaire is the present President of France. 

3.* Madame Lena Lavaliere is one of the worlds (sic) famous beauties. 

4.* A. J. Balfour is England's First Lord of the Admiralty. 

5.* Gilbert K. Chesterton is an English Author and humorist. 

6.* Bismarck was Germany's War Lord who started her dreams of conquest, 
and inaugurated the policy of "Iron and Blood." 

7 * Bernhardi is a German General who wrote a book before the war, show- 
ing the dire needs of an unenlightened world, for German civilization and 
"Kultur." 

8.* Stephen Phillips is a deceased British poet, noted for his lyrics. 

9.* Dr. Van Dyke is an American Poet — one of his poems is "America for Me." 
10.* James Barrie is the English Author who wrote "Sentimental Tommy" and 

"The Little Minister." 
11* Bernard Shaw is an English Author. 



[19] 



English IV Thomas C. Wolfe 

12* Alfred Noyes is a writer of lyrics and the poetical drama. 

13.* Luther Burbank executes marvelous combinations with plants and flowers. 

14* Rothschild is a famous banker of a famous banking family. 

15 * Paderewski is a Polish pianist, the most famous living. 

16.* Beethoven, (now dead) was probably the most famous composer the world 

has yet seen. 

17.* Milton was a great religeous (sic) poet of the seventeenth century. 

18* Martin Luther's doctrines were the downfall of extreme Catholicism. 

19* Calvin was a great religeous (sic) leader. 



[81] 



20.* Savanarola was a great religeous (sic) leader. 
21.* Spurgeon was a great religeous (sic) leader. 
22* Moody was a great religeous (sic) leader. 
23.* J. R. Mott was a leader in Y.M.C.A. work. 



[inside back cover] 

(Editor's Note: The following was written by his sister, Mabel Wolfe Wheaton, on the 
inside bach cover of the 1915 notebook: 

"Written by Thos. Wolfe while at Roberts School known as North State School 
at Asheville N.C. Year 1915") 



<^£D 



[82] 



The North Carolinians Society. Inc. 

North Carolina Collection 
Wilson Library, UNC Campus Box 3930 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3930 



Chartered by the Secretary of State on 11 September 1975 as a private nonprofit corporation under 
provisions of Chapter 55A of the General Statutes oj North Carolina, the North Caroliniana Society is 
dedicated to the promotion of increased knowledge and appreciation of North Carolina's heritage. This 
it accomplishes in a variety of ways: encouragement of scholarly research and writing in and the teaching 
of state and local history; publication of documentary materials, including the numbered, limited-edition 
North Caroliniana Society Imprints and North Caroliniana Society Keepsakes; sponsorship of professional 
and lay conferences, seminars, lectures, and exhibitions; commemoration of historic events, including 
sponsorship of markers and plaques; and assistance to the North Carolina Collection and North Caro- 
liniana Gallery of the University of North Carolina Library and other cultural organizations, such as 
the Friends of the Library, the Friends of the Archives, the North Carolina Literary and Historical Asso- 
ciation, the Historic Preservation Foundation of North Carolina, and the North Carolina Writers Conference. 

Incorporated by H. G. Jones, William S. Powell, and Louis M. Connor, Jr., who soon were joined by 
a distinguished group of North Carolinians, the Society was limited to one hundred members for its 
first decade. However, it does elect from time to time additional individuals meeting its strict criterion 
of "adjudged performance" in service to their state's culture — i.e., those who have demonstrated a con- 
tinuing interest in and support of the historical, literary, and cultural heritage of North Carolina. The 
Society, a tax-exempt organization under provisions of Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, 
expects service rather than dues. For its programs, it depends upon the contributions, bequests, and devises 
of its members and friends. Its IRS number is 56-1119848. Upon request, contributions to the Society 
may be counted toward membership in the Chancellor's Club. The Society administers the Archie K. 
Davis Fund, given in 1987 by the Research Triangle Foundation in honor of its retiring board chairman 
and the Society's longtime president. 

A highlight of the Society's year is the presentation of the North Caroliniana Society Award for 
long and distinguished service in the encouragement, production, enhancement, promotion and 
preservation of North Caroliniana. Starting with Paul Green, the Society has recognized Tar Heels such 
as Albert Coates, Sam J. Ervin, Jr., Sam Ragan, Gertrude S. Carraway, John Fries Blair, William and 
Ida Friday, William S. Powell, Mary and James Semans, and David Stick. The proceedings of the awards 
banquets, published in the Imprints series, furnish rare glimpses into the lives of those recognized. 

The Society has its headquarters in the North Carolina Collection, the "Conscience of North Carolina," 
which seeks to preserve for present and future generations all that has been or is published by North 
Carolinians regardless of subject and about North Carolina and North Carolinians regardless of author 
or source. In this mission the Collection's clientele is far broader than the University community; indeed, 
it is the entire citizenry of North Carolina, as well as those outside the state whose research extends 
to North Carolina or North Carolinians. Members of the North Caroliniana Society share a very special 
relationship to this unique Collection that dates back to 1844 and stands unchallenged as the largest 
and most comprehensive repository in America of published materials about a single state. The North 
Caroliniana Gallery, opened in 1988, adds exhibition and interpretive dimensions to the Collection's 
traditional services. These combined resources fulfill the vision of President David L. Swain (1801-1868), 
who founded the Collection; Librarian Louis Round Wilson (1876-1979), who nurtured it; and Philanthro- 
pist John Sprunt Hill (1869-1961), who generously endowed it. All North Carolinians are enriched by 
this precious legacy. 



Board of Directors (1987) 

Archie K. Davis, President 

William S. Powell, Vice-President 

H. G. Jones, Secretary and Treasurer 

William McWhorter Cochrane Nancy Cobb Lilly 

William C. Friday George Elliot London 

Frank Borden Hanes Edward L. Rankin, Jr. 

Betty Hodges John L. Sanders 

Frank H. Kenan William D. Snider 

Henry W. Lewis Willis P. Whichard 



Picture Credits 

Cover, page 3 (both), and page 9: Thomas Wolfe 
Collection, Pack Memorial Library, Asheville, North 
Carolina. 

Pages 1, 7, 15, 18, 22, 45, 55, 63, 67, and 77: Thomas 
Wolfe Collection, North Carolina Collection, University 
of North Carolina Library, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. 
All rights to text, both pictorial and printed, reserved 
by Paul Gitlin, Administrator, C.T.A., Estate of Thomas 
Wolfe. 



Thomas Wolfe's Composition Books is printed in Bembo type 
on Mohawk Superfine Softwhite, 70-pound paper by the 
Printing and Duplicating Department, University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 



HECKMAN 

BINDERY INC. 

St DEC 90 

N. MANCHESTER, 
INDIANA 46962 j